The montresors revenge in the cask of amontillado by edgar allan poe

This raises a whole host of complicated questions. Unsympathetic Character In addition to being the classic unreliable narrator, on the surface, Montresor is a classically unsympathetic character.

The montresors revenge in the cask of amontillado by edgar allan poe

The montresors revenge in the cask of amontillado by edgar allan poe

The plot is relatively simple. Montresor seeks revenge on Fortunato for some unspecified insult by luring him down into his family vaults to inspect some wine he has purchased. In fact, from the very beginning, every action and bit of dialogue is characterized as being just the opposite of what is explicitly stated.

The Cask of Amontillado - Wikipedia

The action takes place during carnival season, a sort of Mardi Gras when everyone is in masquerade and thus appearing as something they are not.

Montresor makes sure that his servants will not be at home to hinder his plot by giving them explicit orders not to leave, and he makes sure that Fortunato will follow him into the wine cellar by playing on his pride and by urging him not to go. Moreover, the fact that Montresor knows how his plot is going to end makes it possible for him to play little ironic tricks on Fortunato.

The Cask of Amontillado by Edgar Allan Poe Words | 3 Pages. the story many things are used as symbols such as the actual cask of amontillado, the trowel, the jester costume and the setting in which there is two in the story. "The Amontillado!" I said. "He! he! he! --he! he! he! --yes, the Amontillado. But is it not getting late? Will not they be awaiting us at the palazzo, the Lady Fortunato and the rest? Let us be gone." "Yes," I said, "let us be gone." "For the love of God, Montresor!" "Yes," I said, "for the love of God!" But to these words I hearkened in vain for a reply. A summary of “The Cask of Amontillado” () in Edgar Allan Poe's Poe’s Short Stories. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Poe’s Short Stories and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

When Fortunato makes a gesture indicating that he is a member of the secret society of Masons, Montresor claims that he is also and proves it by revealing a trowel, the sign of his plot to wall up Fortunato.

The irony of the story cuts much deeper than this, however. At the beginning, Montresor makes much of the fact that there are two criteria for a successful revenge—that the avenger must punish without being punished in return and that he must make himself known as an avenger to the one who has done him the wrong.

Nowhere in the story, however, does Montresor tell Fortunato that he is walling him up to fulfill his need for revenge; in fact, Fortunato seems to have no idea why he is being punished at all.

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The ultimate irony of the story then, is that, although Montresor has tried to fulfill his two criteria for a successful revenge, Fortunato has fulfilled them better than he has.

Moreover, although Montresor now tells the story as a final confession to save his soul, the gleeful tone with which he tells it—a tone that suggests he is enjoying the telling of it in the present as much as he enjoyed committing the act in the past—means that it is not a good confession.

Every detail in the story contributes to this central effect, and it is the overall design of the story that communicates its meaning—not some simple moral embedded within it or tacked on to the end.Get an answer for 'In "The Cask of Amontillado" what is Montresor's attitude toward revenge or punishment?' and find homework help for other The Cask of Amontillado questions at eNotes.

"The Cask of Amontillado" (sometimes spelled "The Casque of Amontillado" [urbanagricultureinitiative.comˈʝa.ðo]) is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in the November issue of Godey's Lady's Book.

In this excerpt from "The Cask of Amontillado," Edgar Allan Poe indirectly describes Montresor’s deceptive and vengeful character and temperament/5(7).

One of the intriguing aspects of "The Cask of Amontillado" is that we do not know, and cannot know, whether Montresor's relentless and horrific revenge is justified.

Edgar Allan Poe

Montresor's Unsuccessful Revenge: Subtle Irony in "Cask of Amontillado" by Edgar Allan Poe Words Oct 31st, 8 Pages Throughout his literary career, Edgar Allan Poe . A summary of “The Cask of Amontillado” () in Edgar Allan Poe's Poe’s Short Stories.

Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Poe’s Short Stories and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

The montresors revenge in the cask of amontillado by edgar allan poe
"The Cask of Amontillado": Montresor's Revenge | InfoRefuge