Magnet science fair projects

Make a data table like this one in which to keep track of measurements. You will record the measured temperature in the second line and the measured mass of paper clips picked up by the magnet for each trail in the following lines.

Magnet science fair projects

Make a data table like this one in which to keep track of measurements. You will record the measured temperature in the second line and the measured mass of paper clips picked up by the magnet for each trail in the following lines.

Practice measuring the strength of the magnet: It is important to perform exactly the same procedure for each trial. You will practice and optimize your procedure in this step.

With your magnet at room temperature, follow the procedure described in Measuring the Magnet Strengthbelow, and measure the magnet strength the amount of paper clips picked up a couple of times.

Note that small variations in your measured results are to be expected. Scientists call these statistical fluctuations. Your job is to pay attention to ways you might introduce variations and find ways to eliminate those as much as possible. Here some ideas of ways you might introduce variations to get you started: Bringing the magnet down sideways for one trial and flat for another introduces variations in your measurements.

Bring the magnet down the same way each time. Picking the magnet up with insulated gloves for some trials and bare hands for others can introduce variations in your measurements. You might push off more paper clips when using insulated gloves.

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Use your gloves for all trials, even the trials at room temperature. Different ways of piling the paper clips can introduce variations in your measurement.

Create a flat-top pile—at least 2. Once you feel confident that you can make reliable measurements, go to the section Taking Measurements at Various Temperaturesbelow. Measuring the Magnet Strength Create a pile of paper clips like the one shown in Figure 3, below.

You can do this on a flat surface as in Figure 3 or on a plate as can be seen in Figure 4, below.

Try magnet projects for a simple but effective science fair entry.

Make sure the top of the pile of paper clips is flat. A flat pile of paper clips will be used to measure the strength of a magnet.

Magnet science fair projects

With your insulated gloves on, hold your magnet above the pile. Lower the magnet down slowly until it rests in the middle of the pile of paper clips, as shown in Figure 4, below. The magnet rests on a flat pile of paper clips that were originally placed as a flat pile on a plate or flat surface.

The number of paper clips it picks up when removed is a measure of the strength of the magnet. Now, slowly remove the magnet from the pile.

Ideally, you should not add or remove any paperclips stuck on the magnet with this movement.Have you ever played with magnets?

If you have you know a good magnet project can be fun and make a cool science fair idea. It's bound to "attract" the judges to your project. Dr. Helmenstine holds a Ph.D. in biomedical sciences and is a science writer, educator, and consultant.

She has taught science courses at the high school, college, and graduate levels. Updated March 06, Do you like magnets? Science fair projects can examine magnetism or . 4th Grade Science Experiments, 1st Grade Science, Science Fair Projects, Kindergarten Science, Elementary Science, Science Classroom, Science Ideas, Science Lessons, Science Activities Find this Pin and more on 2nd grade science experiments by brandon krovoza.

This science fair project investigates how the magnetic field emanating from a permanent magnet will affect the rate of flow of water through a narrow passage. The experiment will be done using salt solution and tap water, with a magnetic field as well as without a magnetic field.

Get ideas for 5th-grade science fair projects. These are experiments and topics suitable for upper elementary school level science fair projects. You can trace the magnetic field lines of a magnet by putting iron filings on a sheet of paper over the magnet.

These words about magnets are used in the science projects. If you are not sure what they mean, just read the definitions below! Magnetic object – any object that can be attracted to a magnet.

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